Archive for the ‘Vegetarian Food Blogs’ Category

Green Kitchen

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Blog URL: http://www.greenkitchenstories.com/

Welcome to our green kitchen. Here we cook and eat healthy and simple vegetarian food with natural ingredients, whole grains, good fats, fruit and vegetables.

Please e-mail David [david at greenkitchenstories.com] or Luise [Luise at greenkitchenstories.com] if you have any questions or just want to say hi! You can also find us on Twitter, like us on Facebook and check out our iPad & iPhone Apps. [Read more]

Oh My Veggies

veggiesheader_01

Blog URL: http://ohmyveggies.com/

Oh My Veggies is a vegetarian food blog, although my audience is much broader than that. I try to make my meals reasonably healthy and completely doable–I am not professionally trained and I know that after a long day of work, the last thing people want to be doing is spending hours on dinner.

I typically post two new recipes each week, one on Monday and one on Thursday. On Tuesdays, I alternate between informational posts, step-by-step tutorials, and updates on my square foot garden. Every Friday, I post What I Ate This Week, which highlights recipes from other blogs and magazines. [Read more]

Why Go Veg ?

People are drawn to vegetarianism by all sorts of motives. Some of us want to live longer, healthier lives or do our part to reduce pollution. Others have made the switch because we want to preserve Earth’s natural resources or because we’ve always loved animals and are ethically opposed to eating them.

Thanks to an abundance of scientific research that demonstrates the health and environmental benefits of a plant-based diet, even the federal government recommends that we consume most of our calories from grain products, vegetables and fruits. And no wonder: An estimated 70 percent of all diseases, including one-third of all cancers, are related to diet. A vegetarian diet reduces the risk for chronic degenerative diseases such as obesity, coronary artery disease, high blood pressure, diabetes and certain types of cancer including colon, breast, prostate, stomach, lung and esophageal cancer.

Why go veg  ?  Chew on these reasons :

You’ll ward off disease. Vegetarian diets are more healthful than the average American diet, particularly in preventing, treating or reversing heart disease and reducing the risk of cancer. A low-fat vegetarian diet is the single most effective way to stop the progression of coronary artery disease or prevent it entirely. Cardiovascular disease kills 1 million Americans annually and is the leading cause of death in the United States. But the mortality rate for cardiovascular disease is lower in vegetarians than in nonvegetarians, says Joel Fuhrman, MD, author of Eat to Live: The Revolutionary Formula for Fast and Sustained Weight Loss. A vegetarian diet is inherently healthful because vegetarians consume no animal fat and less cholesterol and instead consume more fiber and more antioxidant-rich produce—another great reason to listen to Mom and eat your veggies!

You’ll keep your weight down. The standard American diet—high in saturated fats and processed foods and low in plant-based foods and complex carbohydrates—is making us fat and killing us slowly. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and a division of the CDC, the National Center for Health Statistics, 64 percent of adults and 15 percent of children aged 6 to 19 are overweight and are at risk of weight-related ailments including heart disease, stroke and diabetes. A study conducted from 1986 to 1992 by Dean Ornish, MD, president and director of the Preventive Medicine Research Institute in Sausalito, California, found that overweight people who followed a low-fat, vegetarian diet lost an average of 24 pounds in the first year and kept off that weight 5 years later. They lost the weight without counting calories or carbs and without measuring portions or feeling hungry.

You’ll live longer. If you switch from the standard American diet to a vegetarian diet, you can add about 13 healthy years to your life, says Michael F. Roizen, MD, author of The RealAge Diet: Make Yourself Younger with What You Eat. ”People who consume saturated, four-legged fat have a shorter life span and more disability at the end of their lives. Animal products clog your arteries, zap your energy and slow down your immune system. Meat eaters also experience accelerated cognitive and sexual dysfunction at a younger age.”

Want more proof of longevity? Residents of Okinawa, Japan, have the longest life expectancy of any Japanese and likely the longest life expectancy of anyone in the world, according to a 30-year study of more than 600 Okinawan centenarians. Their secret: a low-calorie diet of unrefined complex carbohydrates, fiber-rich fruits and vegetables, and soy.

You’ll build strong bones. When there isn’t enough calcium in the bloodstream, our bodies will leach it from existing bone. The metabolic result is that our skeletons will become porous and lose strength over time. Most health care practitioners recommend that we increase our intake of calcium the way nature intended— through foods. Foods also supply other nutrients such as phosphorus, magnesium and vitamin D that are necessary for the body to absorb and use calcium.

People who are mildly lactose-intolerant can often enjoy small amounts of dairy products such as yogurt, cheese and lactose-free milk. But if you avoid dairy altogether, you can still get a healthful dose of calcium from dry beans, tofu, soymilk and dark green vegetables such as broccoli, kale, collards and turnip greens.

You’ll reduce your risk of food-borne illnesses. The CDC reports that food-borne illnesses of all kinds account for 76 million illnesses a year, resulting in 325,000 hospitalizations and 5,000 deaths in the United States. According to the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), foods rich in protein such as meat, poultry, fish and seafood are frequently involved in food-borne illness outbreaks.

You’ll ease the symptoms of menopause. Many foods contain nutrients beneficial to perimenopausal and menopausal women. Certain foods are rich in phytoestrogens, the plant-based chemical compounds that mimic the behavior of estrogen. Since phytoestrogens can increase and decrease estrogen and progesterone levels, maintaining a balance of them in your diet helps ensure a more comfortable passage through menopause. Soy is by far the most abundant natural source of phytoestrogens, but these compounds also can be found in hundreds

of other foods such as apples, beets, cherries, dates, garlic, olives, plums, raspberries, squash and yams. Because menopause is also associated with weight gain and a slowed metabolism, a low-fat, high-fiber vegetarian diet can help ward off extra pounds.

You’ll have more energy. Good nutrition generates more usable energy—energy to keep pace with the kids, tackle that home improvement project or have better sex more often, Michael F. Roizen, MD, says in The RealAge Diet. Too much fat in your bloodstream means that arteries won’t open properly and that your muscles won’t get enough oxygen. The result? You feel zapped. Balanced vegetarian diets are naturally free of cholesterol-laden, artery-clogging animal products that physically slow us down and keep us hitting the snooze button morning after morning. And because whole grains, legumes, fruits and vegetables are so high in complex carbohydrates, they supply the body with plenty of energizing fuel.

You’ll be more ‘regular.’ Eating a lot of vegetables necessarily means consuming more fiber, which pushes waste out of the body. Meat contains no fiber. People who eat lower on the food chain tend to have fewer instances of constipation, hemorrhoids and diverticulitis.

You’ll help reduce pollution. Some people become vegetarians after realizing the devastation that the meat industry is having on the environment. According to the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), chemical and animal waste runoff from factory farms is responsible for more than 173,000 miles of polluted rivers and streams. Runoff from farmlands is one of the greatest threats to water quality today. Agricultural activities that cause pollution include confined animal facilities, plowing, pesticide spraying, irrigation, fertilizing and harvesting.

You’ll avoid toxic chemicals. The EPA estimates that nearly 95 percent of the pesticide residue in the typical American diet comes from meat, fish and dairy products. Fish, in particular, contain carcinogens (PCBs, DDT) and heavy metals (mercury, arsenic, lead, cadmium) that can’t be removed through cooking or freezing. Meat and dairy products can also be laced with steroids and hormones, so be sure to read the labels on the dairy products you purchase.

You’ll help reduce famine. About 70 percent of all grain produced in the United States is fed to animals raised for slaughter. The 7 billion livestock animals in the United States consume five times as much grain as is consumed directly by the American population. “If all the grain currently fed to livestock were consumed directly by people, the number of people who could be fed would be nearly 800 million,” says David Pimentel, professor of ecology at Cornell University. If the grain were exported, it would boost the US trade balance by $80 billion a year.

You’ll spare animals. Many vegetarians give up meat because of their concern for animals. Ten billion animals are slaughtered for human consumption each year. And, unlike the farms of yesteryear where animals roamed freely, today most animals are factory farmed—crammed into cages where they can barely move and fed a diet tainted with pesticides and antibiotics. These animals spend their entire lives in crates or stalls so small that they can’t even turn around. Farmed animals are not protected from cruelty under the law—in fact, the majority of state anticruelty laws specifically exempt farm animals from basic humane protection.

You’ll save money. Meat accounts for 10 percent of Americans’ food spending. Eating vegetables, grains and fruits in place of the 200 pounds of beef, chicken and fish each nonvegetarian eats annually would cut individual food bills by an average of $4,000 a year.

Your dinner plate will be full of color. Disease-fighting phytochemicals give fruits and vegetables their rich, varied hues. They come in two main classes: carotenoids and anthocyanins. All rich yellow and orange fruits and vegetables—carrots, oranges, sweet potatoes, mangoes, pumpkins, corn—�owe their color to carotenoids. Leafy green vegetables also are rich in carotenoids but get their green color from chlorophyll. Red, blue and purple fruits and vegetables—plums, cherries, red bell peppers—contain anthocyanins. Cooking by color is a good way to ensure you’re eating a variety of naturally occurring substances that boost immunity and prevent a range of illnesses.

It’s a breeze. It’s almost effortless these days to find great-tasting and good-for-you vegetarian foods, whether you’re strolling the aisles of your local supermarket or walking down the street at lunchtime. If you need inspiration in the kitchen, look no further than the Internet, your favorite bookseller or your local vegetarian society’s newsletter for culinary tips and great recipes. And if you’re eating out, almost any ethnic restaurant will offer vegetarian selections. In a hurry? Most fast food and fast casual restaurants now include healthful and inventive salads, sandwiches and entr�es on their menus. So rather than asking yourself why go vegetarian, the real question is: Why haven’t you gone vegetarian?

Health Effect Of Meat

meet, vegetarian, cook

Meat eating societies, such as the United States, tend to have higher levels of cholesterol in their blood, and higher rates of coronary heart disease, than societies where people depend more heavily on plant foods.

American vegetarians have been shown to have lower cholesterol levels and blood pressure than their meat- eating counterparts. And Italian researchers have shown that substituting soy protein for animal protein in the diets of people with high cholesterol levels can lower these levels even more than is possible with a prudent low-fat, low cholesterol diet.

But until recently the direct health effects of eating meat had not been studied. Now a team of medical researchers from Boston has shown that the addition of meat to the diet of vegetarians who rarely consumed other animal foods produced a rapid and significant increase in blood cholesterol levels. A similar, but also significant, increase in blood pressure was seen also when meat was included in the vegetarian diet. .

The meat used in the experiment, which is described in the August 7th issue of The Journal of the American Medical Association, was about nine ounces of lean beef. It added saturated fats and about 170 milligrams of cholesterol to the vegetarian diet, which contained only 30 milligrams of cholesterol on average. To keep caloric intake the same, the vegetarians ate less of their usual low-fat, cholesterol-free grains, beans,and rice while consuming meat.

In four weeks on the meat regimen, the cholesterol level increased 19% and blood pressure rose 3%. While such other factors as distress over eating meat could account in part for these effects, the researchers, headed by Dr. Frank M. Sachs of Harvard Medical School’s Channing Laboratory, concluded that “the study suggests an adverse effect of consumption of beef” on cholesterol and blood pressure.

Vegetarian Food – Vegan Recipes – Vegetarian Cooking – Raw Food Recipes – Easy Vegetarian Recipes – Vegetarian Diets – Vegan Meals – Vegetable Dishes

Vegetarian, vegan, travel

Blog URL: http://www.vegetarian.about.com/

Jolinda has been vegetarian for over 18 years and made the transition to a vegan diet eight years ago. Jolinda has traveled, shopped, and lived as a vegetarian all across North America and much of Asia, and knows how to order tofu in six different languages, including Bahasa, Malay, Thai and Mandarin.

She is the author of the Everything Vegan Cookbook, Cookouts, Veggie Style, the definitive guide to backyard grilling for vegetarians and vegans, and The Daily Vegan Planner for new vegans needing a bit of nutritional advice and inspiration. [Read more]

Vegetarian truths empower

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By the day, more people are becoming aware of the dangers of a traditional diet and have taken responsibility for their diets. They do so only to be told by well-intentioned peers and “people in the know” that abstaining from meat while being an athlete is not wise. The story has been told over and over again, “Humans are meat eaters- that’s what we do!” Well, we’re just going to set these facts straight and put these myths to rest once and for all.

YOU CAN’T HAVE ENOUGH PROTEIN IF YOU DON’T EAT MEAT

This myth tops them all. Many believe that 1-gram of protein is needed per pound! Well, 5-8% of fruits’ calories are protein; vegetables and darker greens contain 20-50%; and sprouted seeds/nuts contain 10-25%. So, Lettuce gets 34%, while Broccoli and Spinach get 45% and 49% respectfully. Beams range from 23-54%. Most people on a standard meat diet are actually protein deficient. Hemp seeds, macca powder, quinoa, flax, spirulina, greens and sprouts- all super foods are high in protein.

YOU CAN’T GAIN MUSCLE BEING ON A VEGAN/VEGETARIAN DIET

Wrong again. Actually, eating meats can slow down your metabolism because they take lots of energy to digest. Vegetarians actually grow muscle mass at a faster rate with a diet of fruits, vegetables and whole grains. Vegetarian body building means being creative with meals to ensure you have plenty of vitamins and minerals.

HUMANS ARE DESIGNED TO EAT MEAT

False once again. We are more designed like herbivores than carnivores or omnivores. Our teeth, saliva, stomach acid and intestines are similar to plant-eaters. Fossil records show that our ancestors were exclusively vegetarian. Primates are 95-99% vegetarian. Their main non-plant food is termites. B12 is missing from a vegetarian diet not because we need meat. Any food that gets dirty develops B12 from bacteria. Lack of B12 comes from our cleaner modern diet. We get our B12 from meat because it’s dirty. And our need for B12 is tiny, 3 micograms (not micrograms) a day- akin to four grains of rice in our lifetime. Our jaws are made to grind; carnivores’ are not. Our jaws have molars like herbivores; carnivores’ do not.

QUICK COMPARISON:

Cats, who are carnivores, compared to herbivores and humans:

Cat: sharp, pointed front teeth to tear flesh.
Herbivores/Humans: no sharp, pointed front teeth.

Cat: no flat back molar teeth to grind food.
Herbivores/Humans: flat, back molar teeth to grind food.

Cat: small salivary glands in the mouth (not needed to pre-digest grains and fruits). Herbivores/Humans: well-developed salivary glands, needed to pre-digest grains and fruits.

Cat: acid saliva; no enzyme ptyalin to pre-digest grains.
Herbivores/Humans: alkaline saliva; much ptyalin to pre-digest grains.

Cat: strong hydrochloric acid in stomach to digest tough animal muscle, bone, etc.
Herbivore/Human: stomach acid 20 times weaker than that of meat-eaters.

Cat: intestinal tract only 3 times body length, so rapidly decaying meat can pass out of body quickly.
Herbivores/Humans: intestinal tract several times body length.

EATING MEAT IS GOOD FOR YOU

The medical evidence is irrefutable and builds up by the day. Medical studies show that eating meat ends up contributing to heart disease, cancer, erectile dysfunction, diabetes, and other degenerative diseases. Dean Ornish, M.D. was the first person to prove that heart disease can be reversed, and he did so by feeding his patients a vegetarian diet. So if meat is so natural to people why does it kill us? Studies after studies have shown that we are not designed to eat meat. We get sick when we do.

Chubby Vegetarian

Vegetarian, chubby, vegan

Blog URL: http://www.chubbyvegetarian.blogspot.com/

Among the many reasons for being a vegetarian are health, ecological, and religious concerns, dislike of meat, compassion for animals, belief in non-violence, and economics. People often become vegetarian for one reason, be it health, religion, or animal rights, and later adopt some of the other reasons as well.

Welcome to ChubbyVegetarian.blogspot.com! At this blog, you can find many vegetarian recipes. [Read more]

Herbivoracious

Herb, vegetarian, blog

Blog URL: http://www.herbivoracious.com/

Herbivoracious is all about reinvigorating vegetarian cuisine with modern techniques and bold, authentic flavors. They don’t care if you are vegetarian, carnivore, pescetarian or flexitarian. Labels don’t matter. They simply want to make sure that if you cook a meatless meal tonight, it is hearty and delicious. That is the philosophy they bring to this blog. [Read more]

Vegetarian diet: How to get the best nutrition

 

vegetarian, diet, food

A well-planned vegetarian diet is a healthy way to meet your nutritional needs. Find out what you need to know about a plant-based diet.

A well-planned vegetarian diet can meet the needs of people of all ages, including children, teenagers, and pregnant or breast-feeding women. The key is to be aware of your nutritional needs so that you plan a diet that meets them.

Types of vegetarian diets

When people think about a vegetarian diet, they typically think about a diet that doesn’t include meat, poultry or fish. But vegetarian diets vary in what foods they include and exclude:

  • Lacto-vegetarian diets exclude meat, fish, poultry and eggs, as well as foods that contain them. Dairy products, such as milk, cheese, yogurt and butter, are included.
  • Lacto-ovo vegetarian diets exclude meat, fish and poultry, but allow dairy products and eggs.
  • Ovo-vegetarian diets exclude meat, poultry, seafood and dairy products, but allow eggs.
  • Vegan diets exclude meat, poultry, fish, eggs and dairy products — and foods that contain these products.

Some people follow a semivegetarian diet — also called a flexitarian diet — which is primarily a plant-based diet but includes meat, dairy, eggs, poultry and fish on occasion or in small quantities.

Vegetarian diet pyramid

A healthy diet takes planning, and a food pyramid can be a helpful tool. The vegetarian pyramid outlines food groups and food choices that, if eaten in the right quantities, form the foundation of a healthy vegetarian diet.

Lesley Eats

Vegetarians, fruit, recipe

Blog URL: http://www.lesleyeats.com/

“So, what do you eat?” A frequent question for vegetarians. “Lesley Eats dot com” is my answer. I share vegetarian recipes and highlights from restaurant visits at home in Nashville, Tennessee (and from my travels) as well as a little bit about the fun and failures along the way. Joining me are Mr. Eats (previously known as the Significant Omnivore), Baby Eats and occasionally Grammy Eats. [Read more]